SILVERMAN AND MAJESTIC THEATRE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present

Elizabeth Gilfilen: Nightcrawler

Opening Reception: March 4, 2016, 7–9 p.m.


The Majestic Theatre Condominiums

222 Montgomery Street

Jersey City, NJ 07302

201.435.8000

Exhibition on view in the lobby from March 4, 2016 — June 30, 2016

Curated by Brendan Carroll, brendanscottcarroll.com

BG04

Nightcrawler, 2015, oil on canvas, 34 x 25 inches. Photo credit: Bill Orcutt. Courtesy of artist.

SILVERMAN AND MAJESTIC THEATRE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION presents “Beth Gilfilen: Nightcrawler,” curated by Brendan Carroll. This exhibition features a selection of 10 abstract paintings completed in late 2015 and early 2106. Each painting is oil on stretched canvas or linen. Gilfilen’s paintings are built through layers and layers of dynamic brushwork, the wiping away of paint, antagonistic color play, and spatial complexity. Intuition, spontaneity, and improvisation inform her work as much as formal considerations. The results invigorate.

Gilfilen’s dynamic compositions with no fixed viewpoint are animated. The paint roils and seethes across the surface in seemingly perpetual motion. Within the picture plane, intersecting lines and conflicting colors create an undeniable energy. These paintings appear as a conflagration, a dustup, and an apparition. The eye rarely has a place to rest. Within the melee, a form may emerge: an insect, bones, or a tree.

Gilfilen does not approach a blank canvas with a preconceived notion. She has an open mind and lets the painting tell her what it needs next. “I don’t really have any strategy,” she says. ‘[Painting] is very intuitive and changes the moment I begin. I don’t like formulas, and I want the painting to take whatever route it needs to take.” The subject and object of her work is the search to discover elusive forms in the act of painting. Resolution is not a forgone conclusion. Form is not always discovered. The journey, not the destination, is the key.

Although her paintings give the impression they were created during an uninterrupted burst of activity, they more often than not develop in time, in deliberate increments. Her paintings begin with drawing. Accumulated marks grow and deviate. Sometimes when she sees a recognizable form emerge, she negates it. Part of Gilfilen’s process is to sit with her paintings in order to identify what the marks and the forms might be trying to tell her. She works on several canvases at a time, each one influencing the next, in constant call and response. “I enjoy this complicated relationship to the painting that develops over time and across a body of work,” notes Gilfilen.

Line, the individual brushstroke, forms the backbone of her work. Gilfilen’s calligraphic approach leads the eye around the canvas and form the essence of her paintings. Whether thick or thin, straight, diagonal, or curved, lines have a depth, weight, character, and descriptive power.

“I love line and think it captures everything: a record of time, a description of edges, rhythm, emotion, authorship,” she notes. “I want the paintings to come out of that.”

What is thrilling about her paintings is how they straddle the line between frantic scrawl and idiosyncratic calligraphy. Is the viewer looking at childlike scrawl or purposeful arabesques, which pirouette around the picture plane in the hope of finding an elusive image or form?

Gilfilen’s gestured-based work shares stylistic affinities with the New York School, but she is her own artist with her own set of priorities. Unlike her predecessors, she is more interested in illusion and the conjuring of hidden forms from the act of painting. “I want to make those actions into things,” Gilfilen remarks. When asked what separates her work from Abstract Expressionists, she says “We are all just pulling out the threads of the fabric of what we have seen, or the paintings we identify with, and reweaving them. It is like the folk songs that are passed down and rewritten with a slightly different rhythm in the next generation.”

One of the joys experienced when looking at Gilfilen’s paintings is wrestling between two forces: On the one hand, viewers may try to identify a recognizable shape; on the other hand, they may find themselves just taking in the painting itself, surrendering to the spectacle. Gilfilen is aware of the seemingly contradictory forces in her work, and how they may undo or undermine each other. She states:

“For me, there is a huge tension between the basic immersion in making the painting and what that can come to suggest. The work grows as I work, and I have to suspend my expectations of what I think it will be. To be right at the edge of recognizing form is very invigorating, and it surprises me, but only feels true when I have been completely present with the elements of painting. When this happens, I feel I can grasp something made-up, invented, but also sort of “real” or concrete. I love the chase between what slips right into the visual consciousness as I am making the painting and [what] slips away. Every slight move or shift of the line changes the outcome, so yes, I am continuously undoing the painting in my quest to find it!”

The hidden forms in her thickets of lines reside on the tip of the tongue. Part of the fun at looking at her work is trying to match the association to its word.

Elizabeth Gilfilen is an artist based in Brooklyn, New York. She received a BFA from the University of Cincinnati and an MFA from Virginia Commonwealth University. Awards include Yaddo, The Marie Walsh Sharpe Foundation Space Program, Gallery Aferro Studio Residency, Alijra Emerge Fellowship, and The Bronx Museum’s AIM Program. She was invited to make prints at Oehme Graphics in Colorado and was a Studio Immersion Project Fellow at the Robert Blackburn Printmaking Workshop in New York .

Recent group exhibitions include Morgan Lehman Gallery, the Blackburn 20/20 Space, the Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts in New York, NY, and Reynolds Gallery in Richmond, VA. Other group exhibitions include the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, the Islip Art Museum, and Lehman College Gallery. Solo exhibitions include Fred Giampietro Gallery in New Haven, CT; the Hunterdon Art Museum, Clinton, NJ; Gallery Aferro, Newark, NJ; and John Davis Gallery, Hudson, NY. Her work has been published twice in New American Paintings; reviewed in Two Coats of Paint, The Boston Globe, The Newark Star-Ledger and The New York Times.

The exhibition will be on view at Majestic Theatre Condominium Association through June 30, 2016. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000. Majestic Theatre is located at 222 Montgomery Street in Jersey City.

“Elizabeth Gilfilen: Nightcrawler” is the thirtieth exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN. For additional information on the artist, go here: elizabethgilfilen.com.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Robert Hendrickson, Sarah Becktle, Kati Vilim, Mark Dagley, Candy Le Sueur, Ed Fausty, Anna Mogilevsky, Ali Harrington, Sara Wolfe, Anne Percoco, Shauna Finn, Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa,Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

Transportation directions from Lower Manhattan to the Majestic Theatre in downtown Jersey City.

 

SILVERMAN AND HAMILTON SQUARE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present
“From the Metropolis and the Mountains: Paintings by Robert Hendrickson”

Opening Reception: Wednesday, January 20, 2016, 6–8 p.m. 

Hamilton Square
232 Pavonia Avenue, Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.434.8000

Exhibition on view in the lobby from January 20, 2016, to May 6, 2016.

Curated by Brendan Carroll, brendanscottcarroll.com

“I work directly from what I see.” –Robert Hendrickson

Hoboken Panorama, 2010, oil on linen, 30 x 84 inches.

Hoboken Panorama, 2010, oil on linen, 30 x 84 inches.

SILVERMAN and Hamilton Square Condominium Association present “From the Metropolis and the Mountains: Paintings by Robert Hendrickson.” This exhibition comprises a series of modest to large-scale oil paintings on linen, canvas, and wood panel. The mini survey, which spans 10 years, features both urban and pastoral landscapes completed in the plein-air tradition. The scenes are devoid of people but never lifeless.

For the past three decades, Robert Hendrickson has chosen to paint the places he has called home: Jersey City, Bayonne, and Colchester, NY. With titles such as Bayonne Sunset (2008), Pulaski Skyway (2005), Colgate Clock, Afternoon (2010), Pepacton Inlet (2012), Shed in Snow (2010), and Zinnias (2014), Hendrickson’s paintings present his everyday subjects in an unsentimental, no-nonsense style. His brushwork is direct, unfussy, knowing. The paintings are as much about color, light, and shape they are about depicting specific locales.

In a thrilling development, there’s a new sense of brevity to his forms. Hendrickson paints what he sees, nothing more, nothing less: a fledgling tomato plant under the midday sun; a fallen tree in a snow-covered woodlot; an isolated road unfurling into Hoboken. He never rearranges what he sees to fit an idealized view or a conception of the landscape. He is faithful to what nature presents to him. But it would be careless to suggest that his paintings have ever bordered on hyperrealism. Eliciting a sense of space has always seemed to be more important than capturing the likeness of the objects being depicted.

Jersey City Heights

Jersey City Heights, 2007, oil on linen, 20 x 50 inches

Colgate Clock, Afternoon

Colgate Clock, Afternoon, 2009, oil on panel, 10.5 x 14 inches

Hendrickson tends to paint on a modest scale, which he likens to writing a short story. These paintings, unburdened by superfluous detail, simplify the landscape to geometry and hue. From time to time, however, he likes to open up space and paint on a large scale. These works, by contrast, feel more “like an epic novel” to him. Hoboken Panorama, for example, provides a sweeping, all encompassing view of the Mile Square City, which never seems bogged down by minutia.

Intuition, more than emotional connection or convenience, determines what scene he will or will not decide to paint. “This intuition allows me to find landscapes that lend themselves to an interesting abstract arrangement of forms and space,” he remarks.

Woods

Snow woods, 2014, oil on linen, 24 x 26 inches

“I used to really enjoy driving around the metropolis this side of the Hudson, attempting to find my next painting spot. It was like a treasure hunt. It was always the more ordinary that interested me. I never wanted my painting to be overwhelmed by the subject that I was painting. For example, the Manhattan skyline is a very attractive thing to try to paint. But for me, it may be a difficult thing to paint in a way that it doesn’t look like some picture postcard.”

He started painting the landscape in the late 1980s as an undergraduate at American University in Washington, D.C. One of Hendrickson’s professors allowed him to skip class so he could pursue his goal to paint the nearby landscape around the nation’s capital. He has not looked back in 30 years.

Why paint the landscape, and why now?

“It’s an odd thing to be painting the landscape in the present time, but it is something I enjoy doing,” notes Hendrickson. “I think there is a formal visual language that has developed since people have been making [landscapes], and by continuing that tradition, I am connected to something larger than myself.”

Pepacton Inlet

Pepacton Inlet, 2012, oil on linen, 23 x 20 inches

View of Bear Mountain

View of Bear Mountain, 2010, oil on linen

One distinction to be made between his urban and pastoral scenes is temperament. More often than not, the paintings set in and around Bayonne and Jersey City feature nondescript locations: vacant lots, side streets, dead ends. New York City’s skyline appears in many of these works but at a considerable distance, and it is often obstructed by rivers, neighborhoods, and highways. The Big Apple is close but not close enough, more a specter than a thriving metropolis. Per Hendrickson’s eye and hand, the city will always be beyond one’s grasp, leaving viewers to feel as though they’ll never get there.

By contrast, the paintings completed on Hendrickson’s property in upstate New York feel intimate, accessible. The subject matter is always close at hand and within arm’s reach. To look at a painting of his flower garden, one can imagine sitting on a lawn chair in his yard, enjoying a cold glass of iced tea during a spring day in May, possibly playing a game of I Spy with the clouds.

Zinnias

Zinnias, 2014, oil on canvas, 18 x 24 inches

ISE Cultural Foundation, George Billis Gallery, and Rotunda Gallery have organized solo exhibitions of his work. Gallery Shoshinkan, New Jersey City University, Ramapo College of New Jersey, and Frederieke Taylor Gallery, among others, have featured his landscape paintings in numerous group exhibitions. Jersey Journal, American Art Collector, and Dallas Morning News have written about his paintings. He has received awards from Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, New York Studio School, and Wayne Art Center, and many others.

Hendrickson earned his MFA in Painting from Southern Methodist University (2004) in Dallas, TX, and his BA in Studio Art and Art History from American University (1989) in Washington, D.C. He has taught painting at College of the Ozarks in Point Lookout, MO, and New York Studio School in New York, NY. He lives and works in Bayonne and Colchester, NY.

The exhibition will be on view at Hamilton Square Condominium through May 6, 2016. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call 201.435.8000. Hamilton Square is located in 232 Pavonia Avenue in Jersey City, NJ.

“From the Metropolis and the Mountains: Paintings by Robert Hendrickson” is the 29th exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN. For additional information on the artist, go here: robertrhendrickson.com.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Sarah Becktel, Kati Vilim, Mark Dagley, Candy Le Sueur, Ed Fausty, Anna Mogilevsky, Ali Harrington, Sara Wolfe, Anne Percoco, Shauna Finn, Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa,Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

Transportation Directions from Lower Manhattan to Hamilton Square Condominiums

Transportation Directions from Lower Manhattan to Hamilton Square Condominiums

 

 

 

SILVERMAN AND MAJESTIC THEATRE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION presents
Sarah Becktel: Modern Menagerie

Opening Reception: Friday, November 6, 2015, 7–9 p.m.

The Majestic Theatre Condominiums
222 Montgomery Street
Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.435.8000

Exhibition on view in the lobby from November 6, 2015 – February 26, 2016

Sarah Becktel, Restless Tides, 2015, Oil on canvas, 18 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Sarah Becktel, sarahbecktel.com

Sarah Becktel, Restless Tides, 2015, Oil on canvas, 18 x 30 inches. Courtesy of Sarah Becktel, sarahbecktel.com

“The word contemporary is important to my work. I’m interested in depicting the world as it is presented to me, and I experience it.” —Sarah Becktel

SILVERMAN AND MAJESTIC THEATRE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION presents “Sarah Becktel: Modern Menagerie,” curated by Brendan Carroll. This exhibition will present approximately twenty works that includes oil paintings on panel and colored pencil works on paper. Her brand of contemporary realism is defined by clarity of vision, attention to detail, and technical virtuosity.

Becktel uses portraits and landscapes to transform the unusual and make it natural, from stuffed animal heads in a tavern in Wyoming to domestic goats grazing in a cemetery in gritty Jersey City. Her paintings and drawings explore how humans relate to and interact with animals in the modern world. Her work is as much about biodiversity, sustainability, and conservation, as it is about the sober observation and depiction of the world.

Animals appear as confidant, pastoral beast, and stuffed trophy. In one painting, the artist and a raccoon sit at a table to share confidences and Oreo cookies. In another, goats stand and loll atop headstones in an overgrown Harsimus cemetery under the midday sun. However, the relationship between species is not always as benign as it appears. Several works depict taxidermy animal heads eyeballing the viewer with their impenetrable, and vacant stares.

Sarah Becktel, Lost and Found III, 2015, Oil on Panel, 11 x 14 inches

Sarah Becktel, Lost and Found III, 2015, Oil on Panel, 11 x 14 inches

The German Expressionist Franz Marc said that painting animals brought out “All that was good in me.” Becktel shares the same sentiment. “Interacting with and observing animals probably gives me the highest level of joy,” notes Becktel. Her love of animals did not seamlessly find its way into her work. At first, she used them as symbols for abstract psychological ideas. Now, animals are more the central subjects of her work.

The development of her paintings is not a fixed phenomenon. At times, an image is the impetus that drives the painting. “I could be out in the world and observe something that just sticks with me…so in that case, the imagery is the inspiration into a painting composition,” she notes. That said, Becktel does not always rely on the visual alone to inspire an image. In some instances, an abstract idea is the motivation for a given work. In these cases, she has to find “the best way to translate the concept into a tangible image.”

Becktel, who began studying with a classical realist at age ten, is proud of her academic training, but she is not beholden to it. Reference photography plays a pivotal role in the development of her paintings. “Anytime something strikes me as interesting, I snap a photo,” says Becktel. “I’m always coming across things that might end up in a painting.” The link between photograph and realized painting is not instantaneous. It may take months or years before the initial interest develops into a more concrete painting idea. During the gestation period, she often clicks through her photo libraries to see what jumps out at her.

Sarah Becktel, Wolf Tavern, 2013, Oil on Panel, 20 x 16 inches

Sarah Becktel, Wolf Tavern, 2013, Oil on Panel, 20 x 16 inches

Once a raw idea starts to become more tangible, she will do some sketches to determine the scale and composition of a piece. Sketches never become complete works. She finds spending too much time on preliminary drawings can sap the excitement and energy of her paintings. “I like to save the detail for the actual painting,” notes Becktel.

Becktel is drawn to representational painting because it puts her in control of how much information to give or withhold from the viewer. “You essentially set the scene for them,” Becktel said. What I find interesting in her work is how it manages to create immediately recognizable images without sacrificing mystery or suggestion.

Sarah Becktel is a painter who specializes in contemporary realism. She received her B.F.A. from Tyler School of Art in 2005. She continued her studies of figurative drawing and painting at Studio Incamminati in Philadelphia and the Art Students League in New York City. Jersey City Museum, Trenton City Museum, Monmouth Museum, Ben Shahn Center for Visual Arts, and Salmagundi Art Club, among other institutions, have organized exhibitions featuring of her work. Becktel has received numerous honors, including PLAYA Artist Residency in Summer Lake, Oregon, and Brush Creek Arts Foundation Residency in Laramie, Wyoming. She currently resides in Jersey City, NJ and works out of her studio in Newark, NJ.

The exhibition will be on view at Majestic Theatre Condominium Association through February 26, 2016. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000. Majestic Theatre is located at 222 Montgomery Street in Jersey City.

“Sarah Becktel: Modern Menagerie” is the twenty-eighth exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN. For additional information on the artist, go here: Sarah Becktel.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Kati Vilim, Mark Dagley, Candy Le Sueur, Ed Fausty, Anna Mogilevsky, Ali Harrington, Sara Wolfe, Anne Percoco, Shauna Finn, Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa,Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

Transportation directions from Lower Manhattan to downtown Jersey City.

Transportation directions from Lower Manhattan to downtown Jersey City.

Transportation directions from Lower Manhattan to downtown Jersey City.

Be sure to check out Kati Vilim: Radius of Action and Candy Le Sueur: Where Dreams Land exhibitions during the Jersey City Art & Studio Tour 2015. Viewing is from 12 to 6 p.m., on Saturday and Sunday.

Radius of Action is located at The Majestic Theatre Condominiums at 222 Montgomery Street, between Grove and Barrow Street. Vilim’s exhibition features seven hard-edge color paintings that were made between 2007 and 2012. Each painting is oil on canvas mounted on wood panel.

Where Dreams Land is located at Hamilton Square Condominiums at 232 Pavonia Avenue, between Erie and McWilliams Place. Le Sueur’s exhibition features nine large abstract landscape paintings that were created between 2012 and 2015. Each painting is oil on canvas. The exhibition also includes a series of small-scale prints and encaustics.

Kati Vilim: Radius of Action

Kati Vilim, 36 Squares, 2011, oil canvas on wood, 48 x 48inches

Kati Vilim, 36 Squares, 2011, oil canvas on wood, 48 x 48inches

Kati_Vilim_Majestic_Hudson_Reporter_RD6

Installation of Kati Vilim’s Radius of Action. Courtesy of the artist.

Courtesy of the artist.

Installation of Kati Vilim’s Radius of Action. Courtesy of the artist.

Installation of Kati Vilim's Radius of Action. Courtesy of the artist.

Installation of Kati Vilim’s Radius of Action. Courtesy of the artist.

Installation of Kati Vilim's Radius of Action. Courtesy of the artist.

Installation of Kati Vilim’s Radius of Action. Courtesy of the artist.

 

Courtesy of the artist.

Installation of Kati Vilim’s Radius of Action. Courtesy of the artist.

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Candy Le Sueur: Where Dreams Land

Candy Le Sueur, Landed, 2013, oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches

Candy Le Sueur, Landed, 2013, oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches

Installation of Candy Le Sueur's Where Dreams Land

Installation of Candy Le Sueur’s Where Dreams Land

Installation of Candy Le Sueur's Where Dreams Land

Installation of Candy Le Sueur's Where Dreams Land
Installation of Candy Le Sueur’s Where Dreams Land

Installation of Candy Le Sueur's Where Dreams Land

Installation of Candy Le Sueur’s Where Dreams Land

CLS_HSC_11

Installation of Candy Le Sueur’s Where Dreams Land

Transportation Directions from Lower Manhattan to Hamilton Square Condominiums

Transportation Directions from Lower Manhattan to Hamilton Square Condominiums

SILVERMAN AND HAMILTON SQUARE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present
Candy Le Sueur: Where Dreams Land

Opening Reception: September 11, 2015, 7–9 p.m.

Hamilton Square
232 Pavonia Avenue
Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.434.8000

Exhibition on view in the lobby from September 11, 2015 — January 2, 2016.

Candy Le Sueur, Landed, 2013, oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches

Candy Le Sueur, Landed, 2013, oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches

“Sea, sky, and land colliding are completely ingrained in my visual language. This just pours out of me. This is what I love to paint.”  – Candy Le Sueur

SILVERMAN AND THE HAMILTON SQUARE CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION present “Candy Le Sueur: Where Dreams Land,” curated by Brendan Carroll. This exhibition features nine large abstract landscape paintings that were created between 2012 and 2015. Each painting is oil on canvas. The exhibition also includes a series of small-scale prints and encaustics.

Candy Le Sueur’s evocative paintings suggest the natural world. The landscapes she depicts are rarely, if ever, still or recognizable. Light, atmosphere, and bravura paint-handling pervade. Paint alternates between viscous blasts and transparent washes, as each work seeks to strike a balance between solidity and effervescence. Part of the appeal of Le Sueur’s paintings is the threat that one of these forces may undo or overpower the other.

Although Le Sueur’s paintings give the impression of having been executed with great speed, in actuality, Le Sueur constructs her paintings over time, in a deliberate fashion. “I start with a wash of a solid color—usually a pale gray-blue—and let this dry for a day or more depending on the season. Then I apply a further layer of lighter and darker tones, which gives me some structure,” she explains. “Next, I build up the surface using a wet-to-wet technique, addressing one area of the canvas at a time. . . . This way of painting allows me to blend the color and soften where one area meets another. I push the paint around a lot.

Le Sueur paints as soon as she gets going in the morning, usually around 8:30 a.m. “I find my energy is best at that time,” says the artist. She paints for roughly six hours and then takes a break to eat and read. She returns to her studio in the early evening to paint from 4 to 6:30 p.m. She prefers silence to music when she paints. That said, if she needs some creative sparks, she listens to Van Morrison or Rodríguez, a folk musician from Detroit who was famous in South Africa.

When Le Sueur began her career, she concentrated her attention on the landscape of her native South Africa, but soon afterward, the images she constructed could not be identified by a specific region. One of the joys of viewing Le Sueur’s works is the myriad places they evoke: a windswept crag at the end of the world, a jagged coastline deluged by rain, a sunbaked plain enveloped by azure skies. Today, Le Sueur paints her landscapes from her studio in Jersey City. “I don’t need to be in the physical locale to paint my work,” says the artist. “My paintings are landscapes as I imagine them, relying on memory, intuition, and emotion.” Although Le Sueur’s style may recall, at first glance, the gestural brushwork of Abstract Expressionism, what emerges on repeat viewings is the artist’s strong affinity to Romanticism, the early-nineteenth-century artistic movement that turned to nature and the sublime as its primary sources of inspiration. Objectivity is eschewed in favor of poetic interpretation. Indeed, Le Sueur does not so much portray landscapes as she conjures them in the act of painting.

Le Sueur is an internationally recognized artist that has exhibited her work in South Africa, Switzerland, Germany, and United States. National Academy Museum, Jersey City Museum, and Drawing Rooms, among other venues, have exhibited her paintings, prints, and encaustics. Her work is included in several private collections both home and abroad. She received her Fine Arts Degree from University of Johannesburg in South Africa. She continued her studies at National Academy School in New York City. She was born in Kroonstad, South Africa, a small town in the center of the country, about 120 miles south of Johannesburg. She lives and works in Jersey City.

The exhibition will be on view at Hamilton Square Condominium Association from September 11, 2015 through January 2, 2016. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call 201-435-8000.

“Candy Le Sueur: Where Dreams Land” is the twenty-seventh exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN. For additional information on the artist, go here: candylesueur.com.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Kirk Bray, Anna Mogilevsky, Edward Fausty, Ali Harrington, Sara Wolfe, Anne Percoco, Shauna Finn, Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa,Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

Transportation directions from Lower Manhattan to downtown Jersey City.

SILVERMAN AND MAJESTIC THEATRE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present
Kati Vilim: Radius of Action

Opening Reception: July 8, 2015, 6–8 p.m.

The Majestic Theatre Condominiums
222 Montgomery Street
Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.435.8000

Exhibition on view in the lobby from July 8, 2015 — October 31, 2015

Kati Vilim, 36 squares, 2011, oil, canvas on wood, 48 x 48 inches

Kati Vilim, 36 squares, 2011, oil, canvas on wood, 48 x 48 inches

“I am fascinated by the discoveries available through the physicality of paint, color and a simple shape as the square and how these sensory experiences can opening up our awareness and elevate us.” — Kati Vilim

SILVERMAN AND THE MAJESTIC THEATRE CONDOMINIUMS ASSOCIATION present “Kati Vilim: Radius of Action,” curated by Brendan Carroll. This exhibition features seven hard-edge color paintings that were made between 2007 and 2012. Each painting is oil on canvas mounted on wood panel.

Vilim’s straight-faced paintings assert themselves like a prizefighter’s stiff jab. They open up space. She is a master colorist and composer of simple flat shapes, which often have more than three straight lines. In her compositions, both regular and irregular forms jostle, intersect, and overlap to create a dynamic sense of depth, space, and movement. That said, the primacy of the picture plane is never broken. Flatness is key. Surfaces unruffled.

Kati Vilim, 3d2d, 2011, oil, canvas on wood, 48 x 48 inches

Kati Vilim, 3d2d, 2011, oil, canvas on wood, 48 x 48 inches

Color perception — which involves psychology, physiology, biology, chemistry and physics — is one of the central concerns in Vilim’s work. Due to its complexity, she uses a back-to-basics approach to color, which is formal and playful. Most of her work feature a specific set of colors: cyan, magenta, yellow, red, green, and blue. They appear in unspoiled fields — pure, unrepentant, bold. Often, she pits opposing colors next to each other in confined settings, which seemingly advance and recede in perpetual motion. The results are electrifying. What unifies her work is their strong sense of color, clean lines, impersonal execution, and hard edges.

Preliminary drawings provide the foundation for each painting. In this stage, improvisation is not only welcome, but it is also encouraged. For Vilim, works on paper give her the freedom to try multiple ideas. “After testing a few different directions, the final design usually develops itself,” Vilim notes. “I define all the details, and based on that drawing, I start to work on the painting.”

Kati Vilim, Crossing Beyond 2011, oil, canvas on wood, 48 x 70 inches

Kati Vilim, Crossing Beyond, 2011, oil, canvas on wood, 48 x 70 inches

Here are Vilim’s reasons why she prefers abstraction:

“I became interested in abstraction just as I started to paint. It is hard to answer why I started to work with structure and abstract shapes instead of figures or narratives. When I thought about it later, it did become clear that abstraction is important not only for me but for every human. It is part of our everyday life, although we might be not aware of that.”

What I find so intriguing about Vilim’s abstract paintings is how they require, and reward, sustained attention. I imagine some people may find them easy to dismiss, but they’d be foolish to do so.

Kati Vilim is an internationally recognized abstract artist. She investigates the visual language as an abstract system, creating new content based on algorithms, color theory and rhythmic patterns. Her media ranges from oil painting, printmaking and drawing, to electric light installation and digital animation. Her work has been featured in numerous galleries and museums, including The Harold B. Lemmerman Gallery, NJCU, Jersey City, NJ; Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, NE; Walsh Gallery, Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ; Paul Robeson Galleries, Rutgers University, Newark, NJ; Gallery of Modern Art, Veszprem, Hungary, and Panepinto Galleries, Jersey City, NJ, to name a few. The Brooklyn Rail, Hyperallergic, and Jersey City Independent have reviewed her work. Vilim received her MFA from both, University of Fine Arts, Budapest, Hungary and Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ. Vilim was born in Budapest, Hungary. She lives and works in Jersey City, NJ.

The exhibition will be on view at Majestic Theatre Condominium Association through October 31, 2015. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000.

“Kati Vilim: Radius of Action” is the twenty-sixth exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN. For additional information on the artist, go here: Kati Vilim.

Transportation directions from Lower Manhattan to downtown Jersey City.

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