Ryan Turley, White Noise, 2014, digital color prints on cling film, fluorescent back lighting, dimensions variable.

Ryan Turley, White Noise, 2014, digital color prints on cling film, fluorescent back lighting, dimensions variable.

SILVERMAN and HAMILTON SQUARE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present
Ryan W. Turley: White Noise

Opening Reception: May 6, 2014, 6–8 p.m.

Hamilton Square Condominium
Corner of McWilliams Place and Pavonia Avenue
Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.434.8000

Exhibition on view May 6, 2014—August 31, 2014

Curated by Brendan Carroll brendanscottcarroll.com

“I am interested in how viewers respond to familiar elements in unfamiliar forms, situations, and interventions” — Ryan W. Turley

Ryan Turley’s White Noise transforms an industrial shipping container into a giant multiscreened light box. It consists of eight stationary, abstract compositions that are backlit by fluorescent light. The images recall the snowy fields that were found on television screens after a network lost its transmission signal. This effect was an everyday occurrence during the analog TV era. Both abstract and representational, physical and image-based, White Noise will illuminate and activate the grounds of Hamilton Square.

About the Artist:

Ryan Turley is a New York based artist who graduated with his MFA in Sculpture from The Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. Turley has shown in the United States as well as abroad focussing on sculpture and installation works that deal with issues relating to social conditions, politics and sexuality. Turley completed his first large scale pubic art work (2012) with a Jerome Foundation Fellowship and Grant at Franconia Sculpture Park in Minnesota as well as being a finalist for Chicago Transit Authority Red Line Public Art Project in 2013. Turley is currently participating in the Artists in the Marketplace Program at the Bronx Museum, which will culminate in the Bronx Museum Biennial Exhibition in 2015.

For more information on Ryan Turley, or to contact the artist, please visit his website: www.ryanwturley.com

Partners:

SILVERMAN
 is a New Jersey real estate developer, creatively rebuilding urban areas, supporting the arts, while building neighborhoods.

ArtBloc is a mobile art gallery and performance space built from two repurposed shipping containers – it is a dynamic community venue for art, music, dance and theater.

Brendan Carroll is an artist, writer and curator. He organizes a rotating exhibition program of prominent and up-and-coming artists for SILVERMAN.


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Directions from 14th Street Path Station to 232 Pavonia Ave, Jersey City, NJ

Melanie Vote, These Apples, 2013, oil on panel, 9 x 12 inches

Melanie Vote, These Apples, 2013, oil on panel, 9 x 12 inches

SILVERMAN AND HAMILTON SQUARE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present
Melanie Vote: Looking Back Moving Forward: 2004–2014

Opening Reception: May 6, 2014, 6–8 p.m.

Hamilton Square Condominium
232 Pavonia Avenue
Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.434.8000

Exhibition Run: May 6, 2014–August 31, 2014

“I am trying to reconcile the balance between reality and just painting … My challenge is to take the cuteness or irony out of the work, but at the same time to make work that is compelling—exciting for myself and hopefully for the viewer” — Melanie Vote

SILVERMAN AND MAJESTIC THEATRE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present “Melanie Vote: Looking Back Moving Forward: 2004–2014,” curated by Brendan Carroll. Vote is known for her paintings of gargantuan toy figurines that dominate sunbaked rural plains. Though they play a major role in her oeuvre, they represent only a fraction of her output. This exhibition includes roughly 25 pieces from the past decade, which include large-scale oil paintings on linen to small graphite drawings on paper. The subject matter ranges from straightforward realism to the grotesque to something hovering between the two.

Bringing old and new work together can often prompt new insights for artist and audience alike. Surveying her work, Vote is not so much surprised, as she is aware of subtle shifts in tone and temperament.

“Ten years ago I felt a need to prove myself as a straightforward realist, often editing out any tangential or spontaneous activity in fear of being labeled as something other than a realist,” says Vote. “At one point, I just got bored and began to be more playful  . . . I need to feel I have the license to do something spontaneously. I have little drive to just paint a natural image.”

In the past decade, Vote has moved away from indirect painting (layering and glazing) to direct painting or a combination of both styles. She has painted forthright domestic interiors, tawdry pin-ups girls, and post-apocalyptic landscapes. Though her subject matter has changed, Vote is steadfast in her aim to create psychological narratives. What is appealing about her newer work is the evolving relationship between observation and invention, spontaneity and premeditation.

For example, These Apples (2013) presents a close-up shot of apples on a branch, which are set against a flat blue sky. At first glance, the treatment of the subject is objective. The apples have depth, weight, and color. (They are ripe for the picking.) However, on second look, a vertical pink and white checkerboard band divides the composition. The effect is jarring. What makes this seemingly straightforward painting more evocative is Vote’s handling of the leaves, which alternate between naturalistic and abstraction. One leaf, in particular, is white and marked by polka dots.

The artist admits to being afraid one might undo or over the other.

“Oh, yes, I am afraid, and that is what is exciting for me. Taking chances, exploring, changing things from how I initially imagined them to be. . . . But there is a balance I am aiming for, almost like walking a tight rope. I hope not to fall off into the pit of absolute ridiculousness. With realism, if you deviate at all from nature, you take a chance of being labeled a surrealist, or worse. It is a difficult balance; one can easily go down a slippery slope of sheer cheesiness.”

Vote’s approach to picture making, in the artist’s words, is a “mixture of daydreaming and pragmatism.” She is a visual scavenger—culling images from the Internet, direct observation, family photos, old paintings, imagination and memories. At first, she begins with a clear notion of what the image should be. That said, she is does not allow herself to be tyrannized by the original idea.

“I let a [picture] steep for months, sometimes years … Then I have a pivotal moment of ‘Yes, this is how it has to be!’ Subsequently, I have to work in a very focused manner to finish, and that takes as long as it takes.”

The exhibition will be on view at Hamilton Square Condominiums through August 2014. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000.

“Melanie Vote: Looking Back Moving Forward: 2004–2014″ is the nineteenth exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN.

Vote earned her BFA in Craft Design from Iowa State University (1995) and her MFA from the New York Academy of Art (cum laude in 1998). She has exhibited her work nationally and internationally, including group exhibitions with Sloan Fine Art, DFN Gallery, Flowers East Gallery, The Lodge Gallery, and Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, among others. Recent exhibitions include a solo exhibition at Hionas Gallery, NY. Additionally her work was featured in “Hyper-narrative” in Seoul, South Korea, at the Hangaram Art Museum, and at ADAH, Abu Dhabi, while in residence.

She was a recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 2007 and has been awarded various residencies, most recently ADAH, Abu Dhabi, in 2013; Jentel in Banner, Wyoming, in 2009; and the Vermont Studio Center with a full fellowship from the Dodge Foundation in 2002. For three weeks in June 2015, she will be in residence at The Grand Canyon. Vote teaches drawing painting and foundations at Pratt Manhattan and New Jersey City University.

For additional information on the artist, go here: melanievote.com

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynnMargaret MurphyValeri LarkoTenesh WebberGlenn GarverJennifer Krause ChapeauMichelle DollTim HeinsMegan MaloyLaurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim DalyAnn FlahertyScott TaylorJason SederSara WolfeBeth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi KumagaiTom McGlynnVictoria CalabroAsha GanpatDarren JonesRyan Roa,Laura NapierRisa PunoNyugen E. SmithAmanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

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Directions from Lower Manhattan to Hamilton Square, Jersey City, NJ via PATH

A rendering of Fanny Allié’s neon sculpture Glowing Homeless. Courtesy of the artist, fannyallie.com

A rendering of Fanny Allié’s neon sculpture Glowing Homeless. Courtesy of the artist.

Fanny AlliéThe Glowing Home

Exhibition on view March 13, 2014—April 30, 2014

Curated by Brendan Carroll brendanscottcarroll.com

Allié’s neon sculpture of a solitary human figure transforms ArtBloc, a mobile art space built from repurposed shipping containers, into a temporary shelter. A sound installation will accompany the work, which features separately recorded voices by people living or working in Jersey City. The songs, which touch on feelings of home, memory, and loss, will be played back through a pair of speakers affixed to ArtBloc.

About the Artist:

Fanny is a multidisciplinary artist that works in sculpture, installation, and drawing. In her recent public works, she has focused on the human body and its silhouette. New York City Department of Parks & Recreation, Roger Smith Arts Space, and Chashama have organized solo exhibitions of her work. Freight + Volume Gallery, BRIC Rotunda Gallery, FIGMENT, and Dekalb Gallery/Pratt Institute have featured her work in group exhibitions. Her work has been mentioned in The New York Times, Hyperallergic, NY Magazine, and Arts in Bushwick.

In 2005, she earned her M.F.A from National School of Photography in Arles, France. In 2001, she earned her B.A. from Paul Valéry University, Montpellier, France. She has been the recipient of numerous residencies, including Bronx Museum of the Arts Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) program and Artelinea Artist Residency in France.

Fanny Allié was born and raised in Montpellier, France. She lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

Partners:
SILVERMAN is a New Jersey real estate developer, creatively rebuilding urban areas, supporting the arts, while building neighborhoods.

ArtBloc is a mobile art gallery and performance space built from two repurposed shipping containers – it is a dynamic community venue for art, music, dance and theater.

Brendan Carroll is an artist, writer and curator. He organizes a rotating exhibition program of prominent and up-and-coming artists for SILVERMAN.

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SILVERMAN and Majestic Theatre Condominium Association present
Paul Lempa: Icons of Sport

Opening Reception: Friday, March 7, 2014, 7 – 9 p.m. 

The Majestic Theatre Condominiums
222 Montgomery Street
Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.435.8000

Exhibition on view in the lobby from March 7, 2014 to June 28, 2014 

Curated by Brendan Carroll, brendanscottcarroll.com 

I paint athletes, famous and not, from my own unique perspective, hoping to bring people into those simple moments, not just to observe them, but experience them along with me” — Paul Lempa

Paul Lempa, Say Hey Kid, 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 36 inches

Paul Lempa, Say Hey Kid, 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 36 inches

SILVERMAN and Majestic Theatre Condominium Association present Paul Lempa: Icons of Sport, on view through June 30, 2014. Sport has inspired artists since ancient Greece. This exhibition presents a series of acrylic paintings on linen and canvas that feature iconic athletes from Babe Ruth to Wilt Chamberlin, Willie Mays to Serena Williams.

For the past decade, Lempa has meticulously painted portraits of iconic athletes. His paintings are based on old photographs that he finds on the Internet, as well as in old magazines, books, and trading cards. It’s hard to believe some of his paintings were made this century. Often, they feature baseball players in baggy jerseys, short pants, and high socks from the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. These works emanate a bittersweet yearning for a return to a simpler time in professional sports, when athletes played for the love of the game, not the size of their paychecks.

“I do extensive research when starting a painting, and use multiple resources, but usually one main image. Very rarely can you find one image that will give you all the information you need, so the supplementary images are usually facial close-ups that can help fill in the blanks. Once I settle on the main image, I sketch right on the canvas, more of an outline of where figures go, because most times I paint over the sketch anyway.”

Lempa’s portraits are as much about sports as they are about history.

“Many of my subjects performed in a time well before I was born and in places that may no longer exist. As an avid historian, I relish the opportunity to research these episodes to ensure the highest level of authenticity in my interpretations. With full-color photography scarcely available, I am also able to breathe new life into each scene and create my own vivid portrayals.”

Despite the rampant corruption, cheating, and scandals in today’s headlines, professional athletes continue to inspire us. Just like the subjects he paints, Lempa’s work captures the imagination of his audience.

“As a former athlete and an avid fan, I was always passionate about sports,” notes Lempa. “To be able use that passion to now capture some of these magical moments on canvas is a gift I am thankful for. To be able to share that passion with others, and have them connect to my art in their own way is an incredible experience.”

Paul Lempa is a nationally recognized artist. His work has been se­­­­en in museums, group shows, national publications, and featured on Topps baseball cards. The June 2011 issue of Beckett Monthly, the leader in sports collecting, called Lempa one of the “TOP 12 Artists to Collect” and he has show several works at the National Art Museum of Sport in Indianapolis, Indiana. He also participated in the 14th annual Fine Art of Baseball show at Krevsky gallery in San Francisco, CA, and his work can also be seen in the permanent collection at the Bergino Gallery in New York, NY. Recently, Bayonne Community Museum organized a solo exhibition of his work “Gridiron Greats: The NFL Portraits of Paul Lempa.” Paul and his wife, Deirdre, live in Jersey City with their four children.

The exhibition will be on view at Majestic Theatre Condominium through June 28, 2014. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000.

Paul Lempa: Icons of Sport is the eighteenth exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN.

For additional information, go here: Paul Lempa.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynnMargaret MurphyValeri LarkoTenesh WebberGlenn GarverJennifer Krause ChapeauMichelle DollTim HeinsMegan MaloyLaurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim DalyAnn FlahertyScott TaylorJason SederSara WolfeBeth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi KumagaiTom McGlynnVictoria CalabroAsha GanpatDarren JonesRyan Roa,Laura NapierRisa PunoNyugen E. SmithAmanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

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SILVERMAN AND HAMILTON SQUARE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present
Michael Meadors: Defaced

Opening Reception: January 9, 2014, 6—8 pm


Hamilton Square Condominium

232 Pavonia Avenue
Jersey City, NJ 07302


201.434.1000

Exhibition Run: January 9, 2014—May 31, 2014

Michael Meadors, Commercial Art, 2013, Graphite and enamel on paper, 30 x 22 inches.

Michael Meadors, Commercial Art, 2013, Graphite and enamel on paper, 30 x 22 inches.


SILVERMAN and Hamilton Square Condominium Association present Michael Meadors: Defaced, curated by Brendan Carroll. The exhibition brings together a series of works on paper made over the past year while Meadors was living in Berlin, Germany. The series, titled Maiden America, features a collection of young attractive women in various states of undress. In many of the works, the artist scrawls seemingly erratic, painterly flourishes over the face of his sitters, which challenge the idea of portraiture itself. The effect is invigorating.

Portraiture has a long-established tradition in the history of Western art. At first, Christian deities were the primary subjects, then popes and kings, and finally nobles and other prominent citizens. The general idea was to capture the visual appearance of the subject. Modern art upended this convention. Artists opted to capture the psychological or emotional state of the sitter rather than his or her appearance. Meadors, by contrast, is not interested in the inner lives of his sitters. Rather, he uses portraiture to explore issues of desire, voyeurism, advertising, mass media, and the artifice of painting.

Meadors is an artist who wants to have his cake and eat it too. He notes:

“My images are inspired and derived from the presentation of women in advertising, particularly fashion. Fashion offers up a fantasy, a desire to be with or become a beautiful person. It is a facade, no matter how effective or enticing it is.… Commodity and power are explicitly linked to pretty images. 

In a sense I’m as culpable in this power exchange as advertisement firms are. I methodically create a signpost to seduction. I want you to fall in love with these icons. I want your capital. My motives are as shallow as the space I depict.” 

In his portraits, solitary figures appear against nondescript flat backgrounds. He renders his subjects in graphite. The scale of the work relates to our daily interaction with advertising, which towers over most viewers. “The scale of the women staring at the viewer must overwhelm us with their gaze and with their size,” notes the artist. In manner and form, the compositions mimic the controversial advertisements of American Apparel. The barrier between model and viewer is nearly nonexistent. What is shown is an endless litany of attractive women with hard bodies, bare midriffs, heaving bosoms, plunging necklines, and pursed lips. It would be easy to dismiss his work as a cheap thrill, but that would be wrong.

Meadors’s work titillates as much as it confounds the viewer. He goes to great lengths to capture the likeness of a model, only to undermine his efforts with a splash of paint that runs across the surface of composition. These erratic spasms of paint operate as visual deterrents in his portraits, preventing the viewer from having unfettered access to each sitter.

Michael Meadors, Gaze, 2013, Graphite, stabilo pencil, and enamel on paper, 22 x 15 inches.

Michael Meadors, Gaze, 2013, Graphite, stabilo pencil, and enamel on paper, 22 x 15 inches.

In Presentation, a blue aerosol cloud obscures the picture plane. Behind the colored mist stands a young woman in the process of unbuttoning her blouse. Pursed mouth and décolletage are apparent, but her face is not. In Worth a Look, a voluptuous woman is pictured wearing a summer dress that barely contains her overflowing chest. Her appearance is obliterated by a series of erasure marks. Meadors does not always obfuscate the facade of a sitter. Three pink horizontal bands zip across the surface in Commercial Art, just beneath the sitter’s upraised shoulder.

These counterintuitive gestures draw attention away from the model and destroy any notion of illusionism. How could an artist destroy his own work? “With the easy availability of billions of images online, on our phones, plastered all over the city, images have become cheap,” notes Meadors. “It would be meaningless to vandalize over actual photography. There’s no risk in destroying someone else’s construct. There’s much more power to be gained by implicating myself in the process through a meticulous drawing that I obliterate.”

Meadors work is as much about capturing the likeness of his sitters as it is about challenging a viewer’s expectation of such work.

Artist Michael Meadors is a contemporary painter. Sloan Fine Art, Greenville Museum of Art, Hersh Fine Art, and Manifest Gallery, among others, have organized exhibitions featuring his work. He is the recipient of many awards, including Leipzig International Artist Residency Program, Urbanfuse Berlin Artist in Residence Program, and Eileen Kaminsky Family Foundation Studio Residency. Meadors earned his Master of Fine Arts, Painting, New York Academy of Art, New York, NY. He earned his Bachelor of Fine Arts, Painting and Drawing, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC. Meadors was born in California and raised in North Carolina. He lives and works in Jersey City, NJ.

The exhibition will be on view at Hamilton Square Condominiums through May 2014. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000.

Michael Meadors: Defaced is the seventeenth exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN.

For additional information, go here: Michael Meadors.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of John Aloysius Patterson, Mark Dagley, Kati Vilim, Enrico Gomez, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Tom McGlynn, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa,Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

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