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Sara Wolfe, Oh Mickey, 2009, oil on canvas, 23 1/8 x 24 1/8 inches

SILVERMAN AND HAMILTON SQUARE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present
Sara Wolfe: Boom Boom Boom 



Opening Reception: Friday, September 5, 2014, 7—9pm  


Hamilton Square Condominium
232 Pavonia Avenue
Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.434.8000

Exhibition on view in the lobby from September 5, 2014 to December 31, 2014

“I’m really interested in associations viewers have to colors and form. I’m fascinated with how little visual material we need to trigger a memory or physical reaction” — Sara Wolfe

SILVERMAN AND MAJESTIC THEATRE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present “Sara Wolfe: Boom Boom Boom,” curated by Brendan Carroll. This exhibition is a mini-survey of the artist’s painting from the past ten years. For more than a decade, Wolfe has produced vibrant abstract paintings on canvas and paper, which range in size from modest to large-scale. Her work may vary in style and execution, but it is united by her no-nonsense approach to painting. It’s as playful and offbeat as it is serious and substantial.

Bringing old and new work together can often prompt new insights for artist and audience alike. Surveying her work, Wolfe is not so much surprised, as she is aware of a continual interest in color and motif.

“I’m drawn to more geometric works from the past, as my current work is more minimal… Layers and expressionistic marks have made way for what is hopefully a nuanced play between shape and the illusion of space,” says Wolfe.

“Color continues to seduce me, and it’s interesting to see it explode out of earlier work. I am still distracted by the variety of the art store paint shelves and want to try each one. The newer work attempts to be conscious about color choices without losing the intuition of choosing color spontaneously.”

Sara Wolfe, Untitled, 2008, oil on canvas, 32 x 32 1/8 inches

Sara Wolfe, Untitled, 2008, oil on canvas, 32 x 32 7/8 inches

Wolfe creates a seemingly infinite variety of work that can be viewed simultaneously as pictorial and abstract. More often than not, her work is derived from her daily visual experience. From cerebral to intuitive, she explores line, value, color, and texture. Each piece, however minimal, reveals the touch of her hand. Paint, in all its plasticity, ranges from opaque fields to translucent patches. Application is casual, but informed. Color tends not to be stable; rather, it is contradictory and unpredictable.

Sara Wolfe, Untitled, 2008, oil on canvas, 32 x 32 1/8 inches

Sara Wolfe, Untitled, 2008, oil on canvas, 32 x 32 1/8 inches

Of late, she paints organic and geometric forms in cosmic space. These forms twirl, tumble, and play peekaboo. The feel is as unfussy as it is buoyant. There is an infectious joie de vivre about Wolfe’s geometric abstractions. For the artist, paint is a means to an end, not the end. She is compelled by paint’s inherent physicality, especially in contrast to the virtual imagery that bombards the public on a moment-by-moment basis. She is fascinated by how the mind stores and remembers information.

At first glance, it might be easy to dismiss her work as slapdash or unassuming. But to view her paintings in this manner would rob you of a rewarding visual experience. To appreciate this work requires time—minutes, not seconds. In light of today’s hyperdigitized era, which inundates us with a relentless cycle of images, Wolfe’s paintings can offer the viewer a meditative refuge.

Sara Wolfe, Untitled, 2013, Oil on Canvas, 24 1/8 x 23 1/8 inches

Sara Wolfe, Untitled, 2013, Oil on Canvas, 24 1/8 x 23 1/8 inches

Sara Wolfe is a New York City based painter who has exhibited in venues including the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, MA, the 92nd Street Y and Exit Art in New York City, and, most recently, The Center for Contemporary Art and Arts Guild in New Jersey. Solo shows include the Jersey City Museum’s Majestic Theater in 2006 and Gallery Aferro in Newark in 2009.

Wolfe has been the recipient of numerous fellowships, including those from the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation and the Joan Mitchell Foundation. Residencies include Yaddo, the Atlantic Center for the Arts, Vermont Studio Centers and the Association of Independent Schools of Art and Design. Wolfe holds an M.F.A. from Rutgers’ Mason Gross School of the Arts and has studied painting in Florence, Italy and at the School for Visual Arts in New York City. She has taught painting and drawing at Rutgers University, Middlesex County College, New Jersey City University and at SUNY in New Paltz, NY.

This exhibition will be on view at Hamilton Square Condominiums through December 2014. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000.

Sara Wolfe: Boom Boom Boom is the twenty-first exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN.

For additional information on the artist, please go here: sarawolfe.com.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Shauna Finn, Anne Percoco, Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynn, Margaret Murphy, Valeri Larko, Tenesh Webber, Glenn Garver, Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Tom McGlynn, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa,Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

Transportation Directions from Lower Manhattan to Hamilton Square Condominiums

Transportation Directions from Lower Manhattan to Hamilton Square Condominiums

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SILVERMAN and Majestic Theatre Condominium Association present
Shauna Finn: Possession

Opening Reception: Wednesday, July 9, 2014, 6–8 p.m.

The Majestic Theatre Condominiums
222 Montgomery Street
Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.435.8000

Exhibition Run: July 9, 2014–October 31, 2014

Shauna Finn, Liminal, 2013, oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches

Shauna Finn, Liminal, 2013, oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches

“Painting is a constant battle between restraint and spontaneity” — Shauna Finn

SILVERMAN AND MAJESTIC THEATRE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present “Shauna Finn: Possession,” curated by Brendan Carroll. This exhibition includes approximately seven oil paintings on canvas and wood from the previous 18 months. Each canvas depicts a young woman in an elaborate gown set against a flat and nondescript background. The work is an engaging combination of straightforward realism and the fantastic.

This series started out with Finn’s simple desire to paint her wedding dress, an Art Deco-inspired gown embellished in tulle, satin, lace, and beads. “The dress has a lot of razzle-dazzle…it’s all about sparkles, adornment, beauty,” notes the artist. On the surface, the idea to paint her wedding dress may appear sentimental to some viewers. It’s not.

The dress, with its rich array of visual components, provided Finn an ideal opportunity to challenge herself as artist. Finn, by nature, is a direct painter, who, on occasion, is known to slap paint onto canvas with the speed and improvisation of footballer Lionel Messi. This type of headfirst assault would not work. She would need to use a more tactical approach to convey the waiflike material of the dress.

To achieve the level of realism and luminosity the artist desired, she needed to rein in her instinctual drives as a painter. Like the old masters, she uses very thin incandescent paint layers, which do not hide the drawings below. These translucent layers are supplemented by direct, descriptive brush strokes in thicker paint on top. 

Finn uses these techniques not only to sculpt and model three-dimensional form, but also to create a curious radiance that borders on the ethereal.

“I am very consciously trying to make a brush stroke and leave it, or wipe it off if it doesn’t work. I think the key is having a vision and following it. You have to hold that vision in your mind, and each brush stroke has to be deliberate.”

In Liminal, time seems to stand still in the languid setting. A young woman lies prone on a sofa inside an empty room. She is wearing a sumptuous wedding gown, which includes a luminous veil that is unceremoniously placed beneath her head. In her hands, she clutches a crown to her breast. Oblivious, she does not make eye contact with the viewer as she stares off into the distance.

This painting stirs many questions: Who is this woman? Is she a bride, a princess, a prom queen, or a corpse? Where is she? Is she in a bedroom or a tomb?

“I like that each viewer can play a part in finding meaning. I don’t set out with a narrative or concept in mind.”

Finn received her BFA from California College of Arts (1998) and her MFA from New York Academy of Art (2005). Sotheby’s, Mark Miller Gallery, Kraine Gallery, Sloan Fine Art, and The Getty Center, among others venues, have shown her paintings in group exhibitions. She has been the recipient of numerous residencies, including Eden Rock, St. Barthelemy, French West Indies and the Prince of Wales Foundation in Château de Balleroy, Normandy, France. She is from Southern California. She lives and works in Jersey City, New Jersey.

The exhibition will be on view at Majestic Theatre Condominium Associationthrough October 31, 2014. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000.

“Shauna Finn: Possession ″ is the twentieth exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN.

For additional information on the artist, go here: shaunafinn.com

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Melanie Vote, Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynnMargaret MurphyValeri LarkoTenesh WebberGlenn GarverJennifer Krause ChapeauMichelle DollTim HeinsMegan MaloyLaurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim DalyAnn FlahertyScott TaylorJason SederSara WolfeBeth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi KumagaiTom McGlynnVictoria CalabroAsha GanpatDarren JonesRyan Roa,Laura NapierRisa PunoNyugen E. SmithAmanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

Melanie Vote, These Apples, 2013, oil on panel, 9 x 12 inches

Melanie Vote, These Apples, 2013, oil on panel, 9 x 12 inches

SILVERMAN AND HAMILTON SQUARE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present
Melanie Vote: Looking Back Moving Forward: 2004–2014

Opening Reception: May 6, 2014, 6–8 p.m.

Hamilton Square Condominium
232 Pavonia Avenue
Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.434.8000

Exhibition Run: May 6, 2014–August 31, 2014

“I am trying to reconcile the balance between reality and just painting … My challenge is to take the cuteness or irony out of the work, but at the same time to make work that is compelling—exciting for myself and hopefully for the viewer” — Melanie Vote

SILVERMAN AND MAJESTIC THEATRE CONDOMINIUM ASSOCIATION present “Melanie Vote: Looking Back Moving Forward: 2004–2014,” curated by Brendan Carroll. Vote is known for her paintings of gargantuan toy figurines that dominate sunbaked rural plains. Though they play a major role in her oeuvre, they represent only a fraction of her output. This exhibition includes roughly 25 pieces from the past decade, which include large-scale oil paintings on linen to small graphite drawings on paper. The subject matter ranges from straightforward realism to the grotesque to something hovering between the two.

Bringing old and new work together can often prompt new insights for artist and audience alike. Surveying her work, Vote is not so much surprised, as she is aware of subtle shifts in tone and temperament.

“Ten years ago I felt a need to prove myself as a straightforward realist, often editing out any tangential or spontaneous activity in fear of being labeled as something other than a realist,” says Vote. “At one point, I just got bored and began to be more playful  . . . I need to feel I have the license to do something spontaneously. I have little drive to just paint a natural image.”

In the past decade, Vote has moved away from indirect painting (layering and glazing) to direct painting or a combination of both styles. She has painted forthright domestic interiors, tawdry pin-ups girls, and post-apocalyptic landscapes. Though her subject matter has changed, Vote is steadfast in her aim to create psychological narratives. What is appealing about her newer work is the evolving relationship between observation and invention, spontaneity and premeditation.

For example, These Apples (2013) presents a close-up shot of apples on a branch, which are set against a flat blue sky. At first glance, the treatment of the subject is objective. The apples have depth, weight, and color. (They are ripe for the picking.) However, on second look, a vertical pink and white checkerboard band divides the composition. The effect is jarring. What makes this seemingly straightforward painting more evocative is Vote’s handling of the leaves, which alternate between naturalistic and abstraction. One leaf, in particular, is white and marked by polka dots.

The artist admits to being afraid one might undo or over the other.

“Oh, yes, I am afraid, and that is what is exciting for me. Taking chances, exploring, changing things from how I initially imagined them to be. . . . But there is a balance I am aiming for, almost like walking a tight rope. I hope not to fall off into the pit of absolute ridiculousness. With realism, if you deviate at all from nature, you take a chance of being labeled a surrealist, or worse. It is a difficult balance; one can easily go down a slippery slope of sheer cheesiness.”

Vote’s approach to picture making, in the artist’s words, is a “mixture of daydreaming and pragmatism.” She is a visual scavenger—culling images from the Internet, direct observation, family photos, old paintings, imagination and memories. At first, she begins with a clear notion of what the image should be. That said, she is does not allow herself to be tyrannized by the original idea.

“I let a [picture] steep for months, sometimes years … Then I have a pivotal moment of ‘Yes, this is how it has to be!’ Subsequently, I have to work in a very focused manner to finish, and that takes as long as it takes.”

The exhibition will be on view at Hamilton Square Condominiums through August 2014. For further information, please visit us at SILVERMAN or call number (201) 435-8000.

“Melanie Vote: Looking Back Moving Forward: 2004–2014” is the nineteenth exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN.

Vote earned her BFA in Craft Design from Iowa State University (1995) and her MFA from the New York Academy of Art (cum laude in 1998). She has exhibited her work nationally and internationally, including group exhibitions with Sloan Fine Art, DFN Gallery, Flowers East Gallery, The Lodge Gallery, and Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, among others. Recent exhibitions include a solo exhibition at Hionas Gallery, NY. Additionally her work was featured in “Hyper-narrative” in Seoul, South Korea, at the Hangaram Art Museum, and at ADAH, Abu Dhabi, while in residence.

She was a recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Grant in 2007 and has been awarded various residencies, most recently ADAH, Abu Dhabi, in 2013; Jentel in Banner, Wyoming, in 2009; and the Vermont Studio Center with a full fellowship from the Dodge Foundation in 2002. For three weeks in June 2015, she will be in residence at The Grand Canyon. Vote teaches drawing painting and foundations at Pratt Manhattan and New Jersey City University.

For additional information on the artist, go here: melanievote.com

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Paul Lempa, Fanny Allié, Michael Meadors, John A. Patterson, Charlotte Becket, Roger Sayre, Karina Aguilera Skvirsky, Tom McGlynnMargaret MurphyValeri LarkoTenesh WebberGlenn GarverJennifer Krause ChapeauMichelle DollTim HeinsMegan MaloyLaurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim DalyAnn FlahertyScott TaylorJason SederSara WolfeBeth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi KumagaiTom McGlynnVictoria CalabroAsha GanpatDarren JonesRyan Roa,Laura NapierRisa PunoNyugen E. SmithAmanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

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Directions from Lower Manhattan to Hamilton Square, Jersey City, NJ via PATH

SILVERMAN and Hamilton Square Condominium Association present
Laurie Riccadonna: Whisper and Scurry of Small Lives
Opening Reception: Friday, June 3, 2011, 6 to 8 p.m.
Curated by Brendan Carroll

Hamilton Square Condominium
232 Pavonia Avenue, Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.434.1000
Exhibition on view in the lobby June 3, 2011 to September 2, 2011

Laurie Riccadonna, Latitude 44.5, 2008, oil on canvas, 84 x 57 inches

SILVERMAN is pleased to present Laurie Riccadonna: Whisper and Scurry of Small Lives, a new exhibition of paintings and related pieces for her first solo show at Hamilton Square Condominiums.

In 2005, Laurie Riccadonna attended the Fundación Valparaiso, an artist residency, in Mojácar, Spain. This residency, which serves as a retreat for artists, proved to be a seminal moment in her creative maturation. She had time to paint, draw, and ruminate over the valley and surrounding olive groves; she traveled to Seville, Málaga, Córdoba, and Granada, and a variety of small hill towns and villages along the Mediterranean coastline. As she journeyed from city to city, she had the opportunity to see countless examples of Spanish and Moorish architecture, design, and ornamentation. The architecture of the Andalusian region—specifically the ceramic mosaic tiles covering mosques, citadels, and palaces—left a profound impact on the artist’s imagination. Although she was familiar with Moorish design from books and museums, when Riccadonna experienced it up close—standing before the tiled prayer niche inside the Great Mosque or walking down the narrow alleyways of the Albaicin quarter—she gained a more complex understanding of pattern, space, and rhythm. Riccadonna made dozens of studies from these mosaics, drawing and re-drawing their abstract floral and geometric forms.

Laurie Riccadonna, August Fence, 2009, oil on canvas, 29 x 24 inches

Riccadonna identifies similar motifs and patterns in the natural world. A summerhouse in the Adirondacks allows her time to meander along mountain trails, exploring floral and fauna indigenous to the Northeast. No step is for naught. No moment goes unnoticed. A bunch of honeysuckle she walked past in May could eventually reappear in a painting made in December. Lincoln Park in Jersey City plays a vital role in her studio practice too. In particular, she is drawn to the wetland “reclamation area” in the back of the park. This area is nestled beneath the sprawling behemoth of the Pulaski Skyway, and the contrast between the natural world and the industrial landscape is an influence on her work. “Last year on a particularly gray day, I was in the wetland area and saw a gorgeous white swan in the water. It was so stunning in the landscape, and I think of it often when I am working,” she says.

Riccadonna’s paintings predominantly consist of stylized abstract and naturalistic vegetal forms. Her orchestration of vegetal patterns is reminiscent of the Islamic mosaics and Persian illuminated manuscripts that she saw in southern Spain. She places these organic patterns and forms in compact sections that bob and weave throughout the composition. Colors and patterns advance and recede in a never-ending ebb and flow. The common motifs punctuating her imagery include cherry blossoms, lilies, violets, and roses, to name a few. Vertical and horizontal bands, which resemble the bark of a tree, restrain the explosion of plant life.

Laurie Riccadonna, Broken, 2009, oil on canvas, 25 x 15 inches

Moorish architecture and the natural world are not Riccadonna’s only source of inspiration. She also finds motivation in literature, in particular, magical realism. She says: “Sometimes it’s just a sentence from a single story which inspires a painting.” For example, this passage from the novel The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy informed her painting Latitude 44.5:

“The old house on the hill wore its steep, gabled roof pulled over its ears like a low hat.  The walls, streaked with moss, had grown soft, and bulged a little with dampness that seeped up from the ground. The wild, overgrown garden was full of the whisper and scurry of small lives.”

It is easy to understand why Riccadonna enjoys Roy. The author’s prose is definite, concrete, and evocative; it creates an imaginary world in broad strokes and gemlike detail. As a reader, you can envision the powerful hands of nature strangling the “old house” in a slow-motion death grip, crushing its larynx under the weight of moss, dampness, and overgrowth. In her paintings, Riccadonna employs the same attention to detail to paint the knobby skin of a tree that Roy uses to describe the fetid condition of a house. The style of the prose is not the only characteristic Riccadonna appreciates. This passage also “beautifully articulates aspects growth and decay” that is a central theme in the artist’s current work. Riccadonna knows nature can bequeath life as quickly as it can extinguish it.

Laurie Riccadonna, Dragonflies I, 2009, oil on canvas, 29 x 24 inches

Riccadonna works on a painting one at a time. The work is labor intensive: a large painting may take up to six months to complete. She typically draws the lattice and overall structure of the painting first. After she arranges the patterns and imagery on the canvas, she begins to work more intuitively. She admits to being methodical, but she does not allow it to stifle her creativity. The imagery usually changes and evolves as she works. Riccadonna says: “I use the canvas as a record of my thoughts as I make the painting. Typically each painting is referencing a particular time of year, place, or memory, so although I am very specific with the imagery, I also try to allow the painting to evolve and change as I work.  I provide myself with a structure and then allow myself to deviate from that.”

Color is an essential component in Riccadonna’s work as well. Some ideas for the imagery are based on the palette that she is using at the time of painting, but the overall color scheme of a painting grows and changes over time. For example, she may brush in a broad expanse of color on a section of the composition in order to determine what color to use next. One other characteristic to note in Riccadonna’s paintings is her use periwinkle blue. She reserves key sections of canvas for this hue. These oases of pure color serve two functions: They offer a brief respite amid the symphony of patterns, and they sparkle alongside a brown/gray palette.

Riccadonna earned her Master of Fine Arts in Painting/Printmaking from Yale University School of Art and her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting/Drawing from the Pennsylvania State University. Riccadonna shows her work regularly in solo and group exhibitions, and her work is included in a variety of private and corporate collections. Currently a coordinator/assistant professor of fine art at Hudson County Community College, Ms. Riccadonna has been the recipient of numerous awards such as: Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation Fellowship (3), NJ State Council on the Arts Fellowship, and Yale University’s Ely Harwood Schless Prize.

~ Brendan Carroll, Curator

The exhibition will be on view at The Hamilton Square Condominiums through September 2, 2011. For further information, please visit us at SilvermanBuilding.com or contact Liz Dempsey, Executive Assistant, at 201-435-8000 or via e-mail at liz@silvermanbuilding.com. This event is part of JC Fridays.

Laurie Riccadonna: Whisper and Scurry of Small Lives is the second exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Tom McGlynn, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa, Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

Work Samples:

laurie riccadonna, at the edge of silver lake, 2010, watercolor

laurie riccadonna, dragonfly study, 2009, watercolor on paper

laurie riccadonna, gardenias and ladybugs, 2010, watercolor and goauche on paper

laurie riccadonna, jasmine trellis, 2010, watercolor and goauche on paper

laurie riccadonna, newt study, 2008, goauche on paper

laurie riccadonna, september frost, 2010, watercolor and goauche on paper

laurie riccadonna, star flowers, 2010, watercolor and goauche on paper