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Hi,

I am the current guest blogger for PBS’s blog Art:21.

My column, titled Money Matters, will look at how money and income streams influence the type of work and aesthetic decisions artists (as well as curators) make inside and outside the studio. For the column, I interviewed Amy Wilson, Angie Waller, Erin Riley-Lopez, Jen Mazza, Kianga Ellis, Marius Watz, Paula Hayes, Sam Vernon, and Vidal Centeno. The column runs to 5 October 2012.

Art:21 posted my first interview with artist Angie Waller today: Internet Forager Shuns Art World; Embraces Open Source

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SILVERMAN and Majestic Theatre Condominium Association present
Roger Sayre: Little Ticks of Time 

Opening Reception: June 1, 2012, 7 to 9 p.m.  
The Majestic Theatre Condominiums 
222 Montgomery Street, Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.435.8000
 
Exhibition on view in the lobby June 1, 2012, to October 26, 2012.
Roger Sayre, Waterloo Sunset (color study #13), 2012, Unique C-Print, 20x20 inches

Roger Sayre, Waterloo Sunset (color study #13), 2012, Unique C-Print, 20×20 inches

SILVERMAN and Majestic Theatre Condominium Association present  “Roger Sayre: Little Ticks of Time,” curated by Brendan Carroll. The exhibition presents 12 new works on paper by the artist.

Roger Sayre is a conceptual artist who often uses nontraditional materials in his work—utility buckets, vinyl records, dog biscuits, tennis balls. What unites his diverse body of work is the sense of play in which the pieces were conceived and executed. For “Little Ticks of Time,” Sayre exposes colored light to photosensitive paper in the darkroom, forgoing both camera and film negative. His methods hark back to the early pioneers of photography in the 1830s and 1840s, like Henry Fox Talbot and Anna Atkins. By returning to basics, the fundamentals of form and color, Sayre looks back but also forward.

The entire series is based on an arrangement of numerous colored squares, which appear to be huddling beside one another like siblings in the backseat of a long car ride. This geometric formula is Sayre’s model for exploring the subjective experience of color—the effects that adjacent colors have on one another, for example, and the illusion of flat planes of color advancing or receding in space.

Waterloo Sunset, one picture from the current exhibition, features a series of cubes, which incrementally change in color—for example, from light pink to dark magenta, orange to burgundy. The title of this piece, like many in the exhibition, is named after a song—in this case, the Kinks’ 1967 hit single. “Little Ticks of Time,” the title of the exhibition, refers to a 1969 children’s song by Glaswegian raconteur Matt McGinn.

The artist frequently listens to this music while he works. It is a must, like coffee in the morning. Often, the title of a given work is based on what he listened to that day. Sayre won’t go so far to say the music he listens to as he works informs this series, but he will concede it contributes to the atmosphere in which he makes decisions.

“To me, the pieces have life and personality, and naming them Color Study Number 21 is just too cold and scientific,” says Sayre. “A name like Wild Honey or Waterloo Sunset breathes a little atmosphere into them.”

Sayre not only listens to music when he makes work, but he also incorporates music into his work, e.g., he uses LP record covers as straight edges, and LP records as round forms. Sayre’s approach to making art is also deeply theoretical. He creates and uses a subjective paradigm, or rule-based system, to find a solution to a given problem. It is as much cause and effect as it is trial and error. Sayre loves the term “happy accident,” and says, “Most of my work springs from it one way or another.”

“Being open and observant enough to pounce when something new is revealed by accident is key. I think of Samuel Beckett’s, ‘Try again. Fail again. Fail better,’ or Ben Franklin’s, ‘I haven’t failed. I’ve just found 10,000 ways that won’t work.’ ”

Sayre comments: “I am fascinated with process, and I like to see where things go. . . . In a way, it seems like anything can happen. Often I am completely surprised by what I see once the paper is processed. I usually don’t know exactly how my work will turn out.”

Roger Sayre (b. 1963) received his B.F.A. from Bowling Green State University in 1985. He received his M.F.A. from Pratt Institute in 1992. Sayre cofounded (re)mixed media, an ongoing collaboration with artist David Poppie. Sayre’s work has been featured in Bronx Museum of the Arts, Jersey City Museum, Shore Institute of Contemporary Art, A.M. Richard Fine Art, Allen Priebe Gallery (University of Wisconsin), Regina Gouger Miller Gallery (Carnegie Mellon University), among others. His work has been reviewed by The New York Times, The Pinhole Journal, Flash News, and Pittsburgh Tribune. He lives and works in Jersey City, NJ.

The exhibition will be on view at Majestic Theatre Condominiums through October 26, 2012. For further information, please visit us at SilvermanBuilding.com or call number (201) 435-8000.

Roger Sayre : Little Ticks of Time is the ninth exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Glenn GarverJennifer Krause ChapeauMichelle DollTim HeinsMegan MaloyLaurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim DalyAnn FlahertyScott TaylorJason SederSara WolfeBeth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi KumagaiTom McGlynnVictoria CalabroAsha GanpatDarren JonesRyan Roa,Laura NapierRisa PunoNyugen E. SmithAmanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

SILVERMAN and Hamilton Square Condominium Association present

Glenn Garver: Recent Paintings
Opening Reception: Thursday, May 10, 2012

Hamilton Square Condominium
232 Pavonia Avenue, Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.434.1000

Exhibition Run: May 10, 2012–August 31, 2012

Glenn Garver, Untitled, 2012, oil and spray paint on canvas, 32 x 42 inches

Glenn Garver, Untitled, 2012, oil and spray paint on canvas, 32 x 42 inches

“All my painting is intuitive”
–Glenn Garver

Recent Paintings is a new body of abstract painting and works on paper by artist Glenn Garver. Paint—the medium—is both subject and object of Garver’s work. Though he has strong ties to American postwar gestural abstraction, his work is a unique investigation of the nature and possibility of paint. In some areas of canvas, paint is as creamy as ice cream, and looks as though he applied it to the canvas using a wide trowel from Cold Stone Creamery. In other areas, paint rises and falls like ocean spray during high tide.

Garver’s bravura handling of paint sets him apart from his contemporaries. Often large in scale, his allover compositions are notable for their short, kinetic bursts and continuous sweeps of color, which appear to have been painted quickly. These violent and chaotic gestures suggest a raw, almost primal, intensity. Garver, however, is no madman. Atmospheric expanses of pure color subdue his kamikaze brushwork.

Garver prefers to work in his studio at night when the building is quiet. His approach is no-nonsense as much as it is varied. A typical session begins with the artist’s decision to work on stretched canvas, paper, or found material. The painting surface dictates his approach, and, ultimately, the outcome of the final work. To create his moody compositions, Garver uses whatever paint he can get his hands on—oil, latex, enamel, and aerosol spray paint. He also does not limit himself to paintbrushes alone, but instead uses a range of tools, including palette knives and trowels.

Each type of paint and tool provides its own distinct mark. Aerosol spray paint, for example, provides a soft or hard edge; it can cover large areas of canvas quickly, and its color selection is vast. Oil paint, on the hand, is viscous, standing in direct opposition to aerosol spray paint.

Garver’s painting is not a reaction to the environment—urban or otherwise, but an organic response that comes from within the artist himself. From the first mark Garver releases onto the canvases, his paintings walk a tightrope between improvisation and premeditation. Do not look for recognizable subjects or objects, but indulge in his work’s sensuous color, rich surfaces, and dramatic gestures.

Garver’s paintings have the immediacy and force of a liver shot in boxing—a quick body punch to the liver with a left hook. Micky Ward knocked down Arturo Gatti with such a shot in the ninth round of their historic first fight. The effects of Garver’s work are just as devastating.

~ Brendan Carroll, Curator

The exhibition will be on view at The Hamilton Square Condominiums through August 31, 2012. For further information, please visit us at SilvermanBuilding.com or call number (201) 435-8000.

Glenn Garver: Recent Paintings is the eighth exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Michelle DollTim HeinsMegan MaloyLaurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim DalyAnn FlahertyScott TaylorJason Seder, Sara WolfeBeth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi KumagaiTom McGlynnVictoria CalabroAsha GanpatDarren JonesRyan Roa,Laura NapierRisa PunoNyugen E. SmithAmanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

SILVERMAN and Majestic Theatre Condominium Association present
Jennifer Krause Chapeau | From the Road
 
Opening Reception: March 2, 2012, 7 to 9 p.m.  
The Majestic Theatre Condominiums 
222 Montgomery Street, Jersey City, NJ 07302
201.435.8000
 
Exhibition on view in the lobby March 2, 2012, to May 28, 2012.

Jennifer Krause Chapeau, Platanes, 2011, oil on canvas (diptych), 26 x 70 inches

“Time has a way of flying by . . . but what can you do?”

–Jennifer Krause Chapeau    

From the Road is a 10-year survey of landscape paintings by artist Jennifer Krause Chapeau. Each painting depicts a landscape observed from the vantage point of a moving vehicle. The objects of her attention range from the American Southwest to the French countryside. Her paintings are as much about the passing of time as they are about light, and its changing affects, on the terrain.

To walk like a hunter through the woods is not in Krause Chapeau’s temperament. She does not specialize in majestic scenes of nature; she prefers sundry roadside scenes. The land is not wild, idyllic, or hospitable, but fleeting. These vistas are temporary, on the verge of disappearing, as she bounds down the highway.

This series of paintings is based on the artist’s personal snapshots that were found in drawers, folders, and manila envelopes, many of which are 14 years old or more. She relies on spontaneity to choose what subjects to capture. There is not a direct tie to a particular landscape, but intuitive response to what she sees. Krause Chapeau is a roadrunner and her domain is the highway, which may seem odd for a landscape painter.

Like many Americans, her experience of nature tends to be mediated through nostalgia or another source, like photography—not direct experience. As a landscape painter, her challenge is not to endure subzero temperatures and blackfly-infested summers to create a representational scene, but to suggest motion and light: landscape as moving target, all soft focus and subtle blur.

Seeing a landscape in motion was a revelation for her. Speed eliminated detail, reducing entire scenes to color and light. “I think the solitude of driving alone for long periods allows your mind to really wander,” says Krause Chapeau. “The compositions and textures are constantly changing and flowing one into another while driving. It is a fascinating visual experience for me.”

At first glance, Krause Chapeau’s unadorned landscapes can strike the viewer as clear-eyed depictions of nature. A lazy mountain lounges on a desolate patch of land in twilight, as in “New Mexico Plain.” A chorus line of pine trees skinny-dips in autumnal sunlight, as in “Fleeting Fall.” On repeated viewings, her work becomes more complex and engaging, as it hovers between conventional representation and minimalist abstraction. For example, in the paintings “Morning Frost” or “French Plain,” she sees the landscape as a geometric division of space, sensuously worked surface, and luminous color.

Unlike photorealist painters, Krause Chapeau uses photographs as a starting point rather than as a model to be meticulously copied as an end unto itself. She is interested in the process of applying paint to canvas not only as a means of conveying information but also to embody a poetic force.

To view these paintings is to exist in a place between hopeful anticipation and regret. A roadside is not a definite location, but something that is neither here nor there, a thing between destination points. Her photographs of the landscape provide her an outlet to ruminate on memory, place, and time. The blurry images of her paintings are an appropriate metaphor to suggest time and motion, but they also highlight the sensuality of paint.

The artist, starry-eyed and mesmerized, staring through a car window to the frozen fields, and beyond, as the terrain continuously unfolds like a cinema reel.

Jennifer Krause Chapeau (b. 1962) received her B.F.A. from University of Michigan, School of Art and Design, in 1984; and attended the Studio and Stage Design Forum, in New York City, from 1985—1987. Krause Chapeau’s work has been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions throughout the United States. She is an official member of the United Scenic Artists Local 829, 1987—present. She lives in Jersey City, New Jersey.  

~ Brendan Carroll

The exhibition will be on view at Majestic Theatre Condominiums through May 28, 2012. For further information, please visit us at SilvermanBuilding.com or call number (201) 435-8000.

Jennifer Krause Chapeau, From the Road is the seventh exhibition that Brendan Carroll will organize for SILVERMAN.

SILVERMAN has presented the works of Michelle Doll, Tim Heins, Megan Maloy, Laurie Riccadonna, Thomas John Carlson, Tim Daly, Ann Flaherty, Scott Taylor, Jason Seder, Sara Wolfe, Beth Gilfilen, Andrzej Lech, Hiroshi Kumagai, Tom McGlynn, Victoria Calabro, Asha Ganpat, Darren Jones, Ryan Roa, Laura Napier, Risa Puno, Nyugen E. Smith, Amanda Thackray, and Kai Vierstra.

Kati Vilim, 3D-2D, 2011, oil, canvas over panel, 48x48 in

New Jersey is dirty. [A garbage truck groans.] That’s a fact. If you want purity, go see Kati Vilim’s series of modest new paintings. It comes with a price. Her geometric abstractions declare themselves like a smack in the face. I’m no masochist, but I need a wake-up call from time to time.

Working in the tradition of Russian Constructivism, Vilim makes paintings of vibrant geometric shapes that float above pristine white expanses. The look is spartan, but the mood is light.

Kati Vilim, Straight Up!, 2011, oil, canvas over panel, 24x24 in

In Straight Up, a series of geometric forms come together as a cadre of “V” and “L” shapes. To the lower left-hand side, short and deliberate bands of color huddle at edge of the canvas. In Movement, a series of colored bars zigzag above a white field as a jumble of trapezoids–demarcated by thin contour lines–bandy about.

3D-2D presents a three-dimensional network of cubes, which evoke the pyramid from Q*bert. Overhead, a colorful assembly of floating, irregular quadrilaterals rises and falls. Crossing Beyond presents a sequence of interlocking planes of pure color, which intersect in odd, often unexpected moments. A sharp red triangle pops its head up like a prairie dog. A thin band of magenta acts as a DMZ between larger geometric bodies.

Vilim restricts her palette to red, green, blue, cyan, magenta, and yellow. The colors are what they are. Nothing more. Nothing less. There is no subtext.

Shapes range from squares and rectangles to parallelograms and irregular polygons. The lines are crisp but not perfect (she does not use tape to mask sections). Though restrained, the paint has been applied to give the suggestion of the artist’s hand. At first glance, the white backgrounds look pure and unruffled. On closer inspection, the surface is warm and creamy like a thin spread of butter. Hints of pencil marks begin to reveal themselves.

When you see them in person, the colored shapes are constantly advancing and receding on the picture plane, allowing your imagination to play. In your mind’s eye, the shapes may conjure up Christmas lights flickering around an artificial tree; in another, agitated teenagers bouncing off the streets after school; elsewhere, unruly commuters shifting from side-to-side on a crowded subway platform. I think of crude computer games for Atari 2600: Pong, Berzerk, Breakout. I detect banners, flags, emblems, and vintage travel posters from the 1960s.

A light installation by Vilim.

I imagine it is easy to dismiss Vilim’s paintings. (Colored shapes on white canvases do not scream: Look at me.) To behold their quiet visual aplomb requires time–minutes, not seconds. In the room adjacent to the gallery, Vilim installed a set of 10 fluorescent lights to the wall. Though the lights vary in length and color, they hang upright, with small gap between them. Like Dan Flavin, these lights inhabit the space, bathing the room in light and color.

Kati Vilim: Luminous Angle was up at The Kedar Studio of Art from October 21 to November 19, 2011.